DOI: https://doi.org/10.22141/2312-413x.6.1.2018.125632

Using oral rehydration solution (oral rehydration salt) with the addition of probiotic strain for the treatment of children with acute infectious pathology

S.O. Kramarov, L.V. Zakordonets, V.V. Yevtushenko

Abstract


Background. Dehydration may be present in children with acute infectious pathology, for elimination of which we can use oral rehydration solutions (oral rehydration salts). When antibiotic therapy is prescribed, about 11–40 % of children have antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). To prevent the development of AAD, it is recommended to use probiotic drugs. Purpose of the study: to examine the efficacy and tolerability of the oral rehydration solution (Rehydron Bio) to maintain the water-electrolyte balance and prevent dysbiotic disorders in children with acute infectious diseases. Materials and methods. The study involved 60 children aged 3 to 14 years old with acute infectious diseases, who underwent in-patient treatment at the clinical basis of the department of children’s infectious diseases of Bogomolets NMU and received antibacterial therapy. The main group consisted of 30 children, who received Rehydron Bio as a part of comprehensive therapy. The comparison group included 30 children, who received standard therapy and were compensated for fluid loss by traditional means (tea, drinking water, etc.). Results. Among dehydration symptoms, the most often ones were the thirst and dryness of the mucous membranes, which were detected in 40–63 % of patients during the first day after hospitalization. The restoration of water-electrolyte balance due to the introduction of water and basic mineral substances ensures the rapid disappearance of dehydration symptoms. The AAD was detected in 10.0 % of patients in comparison group, the additional introduction of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG prevented the development of this complication. Conclusions. Oral rehydration with Rehydron Bio is an effective therapy of water-electrolyte disturbances in children with acute infectious diseases. The presence in Rehydron Bio of probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG allows it to be used to prevent AAD in children with acute infectious diseases.


Keywords


dehydration; antibiotic-associated diarrhea; children

References


Мbakwa CA, Scheres L, Penders J, Mommers M, Thijs C, Arts IC. Early Life Antibiotic Exposure and Weight Development in Children. J Pediatr. 2016 Sep;176:105-113.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.06.015.

Wu P, Feldman AS, Rosas-Salazar C, et al. Relative Importance and Additive Effects of Maternal and Infant Risk Factors on Childhood Asthma. PLoS One. 2016;11(3):e0151705. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0151705.

Hayes SR, Vargas AJ. Probiotics for the Prevention of Pediatric Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea. Explore (NY). 2016;12(6):463-466. doi: 10.1016/j.explore.2016.08.015.

Szajewska H, Canani RB, Guarino A, et al. Probiotics for the Prevention of Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea in Children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2016;62(3):495-506. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000001081.

Cameron D, Hock QS, Kadim M, et al. Probiotics for gastrointestinal disorders: Proposed recommendations for children of the Asia-Pacific region. World J Gastroenterol. 2017;23(45):7952-7964. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v23.i45.7952.

Blaabjerg S, Artzi DM, Aabenhus R. Probiotics for the Prevention of Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea in Outpatients-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Antibiotics (Basel). 2017;6(4). pii E21. doi: 10.3390/antibiotics6040021.

Matsubara VH, Wang Y, Bandara HM, Mayer MP, Samaranayake LP. Probiotic lactobacilli inhibit early stages of Candida albicans biofilm development by reducing their growth, cell adhesion, and filamentation. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2016;100(14):6415-26. doi: 10.1007/s00253-016-7527-3.

Plaza-Díaz J, Ruiz-Ojeda FJ, Gil-Campos M, Gil A. Immune-Mediated Mechanisms of Action of Probiotics and Synbiotics in Treating Pediatric Intestinal Diseases. Nutrients. 2018 Jan 5;10(1). pii: E42. doi: 10.3390/nu10010042.

Guppy MP, Mickan SM, Del Mar CB, Thorning S, Rack A. Advising patients to increase fluid intake for treating acute respiratory infections (Review). Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. 2011;(2):CD004419. doi: 10.1002/14651858.

National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK). Feverish illness in children assessment and initial management in children younger than 5 years. London: Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (UK); 2013. PMID: 25340238.

World Health Organization. Management of the child with a serious infection or severe malnutrition: guidelines for care at the first-referral level in developing countries. WHO; 2000. 162 p.

Guppy MP, Mickan SM, Del Mar CB. “Drink plenty of fluids”: a systematic review of evidence for this recommendation in acute respiratory infections. BMJ. 2004 Feb 28;328(7438):499-500. doi: 10.1136/bmj.38028.627593.BE.

WHO. Oral rehydration Salts (ORS). UNICEF/WHO; 2002. 6 p.

Ministry of Health of Ukraine. Order No 354 dated July 9, 2004. Protocols of diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases in children. Available from: http://old.moz.gov.ua/ua/portal/dn_20040709_354.html. Accessed: July 31, 2004. (in Ukrainian).

Koyfman A. Pediatrics Dehydration. Available from: https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/801012-overview. Updated: Nov 15, 2017.

Hojsak I, Szajewska H, Canani RB, et al. Probiotics for the Prevention of Nosocomial Diarrhea in Children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2018;66(1):3-9. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000001637.

World Health Organization. Report on the burden of endemic health care-associated infection worldwide. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011. 40 p.

Hojsak I, Abdović S, Szajewska H, Milosević M, Krznarić Z, Kolacek S. Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of nosocomial gastrointestinal and respiratory tract infections. Pediatrics. 2010;125(5):e1171-7. doi: 10.1542/peds.2009-2568.

Issa I, Moucari R. Probiotics for antibiotic-associated diarrhea: do we have a verdict? World J Gastroenterol. 2014;20(47):17788-95. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v20.i47.17788.




Copyright (c) 2018 ACTUAL INFECTOLOGY

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

 

© Publishing House Zaslavsky, 1997-2018

 

   Seo анализ сайта